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Snoring

How to Treat Snoring

Snoring is common, affecting as many as half of adults at one time or another. But when it happens all the time, it isn’t just a nuisance for those who are trying to sleep within earshot. It can cut into everyone’s sleep quality—including the person who is snoring. And it can be a marker of a more serious sleep problem like obstructive sleep apnea. Luckily, there are things that you can do to clear the air. Sleep on your side. If you’re a back sleeper, your tongue may fall back into your throat, partially blocking the airway and leading to noisy breathing and snoring. To re-train your body, borrow a trick from pregnant women, who are also…

Surgery for Snoring

For people with severe snoring problems, it can sometimes feel like there isn’t any way to fix the issue. So when nothing else works, it’s obvious why someone might consider surgery. Which kind of surgery is best? That depends on what is making you snore in the first place. Take a look at some common procedures below. One type of surgery for snoring focuses on the soft palate on the back of the roof of your mouth. When you snore, that area vibrates, causing the noise. So the idea is that if you make the palate stiffer, there will be fewer vibrations (and therefore less noise). You can opt for radiofrequency palatoplasty,…

What is Sleep Apnea?

Learn the signs that may point to this condition.   Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night gasping for air? Does your partner complain about your incessant, loud snoring? Do you feel more tired in the morning than when you went to bed? Then you could be one of the 18 million American adults who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is a condition in which the upper passages of your airways close up, cutting off your oxygen and interrupting your breathing until you wake up and start breathing again. The only way to confirm whether you have sleep apnea is to take a sleep test, where experts record what happens while…

Improve Your Snoring …and Reduce Your Chances of Sleeping on the Couch

  Snoring is common, especially as we get older. While it rarely bothers the actual snorer, it can be a huge annoyance to the person sound asleep next to you. Sure, sleeping in separate rooms is one solution, but let’s explore a few other options first: Make a lifestyle change: That’s right – drinking alcohol, smoking, and taking muscle relaxants or sedative medications can worsen snoring. Try abstaining for a few days and see if you notice any improvement.  Try a new sleeping position: For all of you back sleepers – unfortunately, you are more prone to snoring. There is an array of positioning devices available to help you stay off your back. For those interested in…

Why People Snore

The reasons behind one of the noisiest (and most frustrating) nighttime issues   Chances are, you know what snoring sounds like and how annoying it can be to listen to. But why does it happen? That is less well-known. The basic reason for the rumbling is tissue in and around the upper airways that, during the act of breathing, vibrates. Those vibrations are what produce the sound. It isn’t always the same body part vibrating—it can be the tongue, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, or other areas. And although it seems obvious, it’s worth noting that nobody snores when they are awake. This is because when you sleep, the muscles relax in your body, including…

How to Prevent Snoring

Get rid of the earplugs and get ready to rest easy with these 10 tips to put snoring to rest. As many as 45 percent of people snore. But what may seem like a harmless habit can take a toll on your relationship, your memory, and even your health. In fact, three out of four people who snore have , a type of snoring that causes you to stop breathing for brief periods, disrupts your sleep so you’re more likely to feel fatigued during the day, and raises your risk for heart disease. But if you’re feeling helpless about this habit that strikes when you’re fast asleep, have no fear. Below, 10 smart…

Does Snoring Mean I Have Sleep Apnea?

Learn how serious your snoring really is. Snoring can do a lot more harm than just annoy your partner—it can lead to poor sleep quality and quantity. About 90 million Americans suffer from snoring; as many as half of those may have the sleep disorder Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). While OSA almost always causes loud and regular snoring, just because you snore doesn’t mean that you have OSA. Sleep apnea is a serious condition in which your breathing is obstructed, causing you to wake up in order to start breathing again. Regular snoring doesn’t typically wake you up. One way to tell the difference between snoring and OSA is to look for the symptoms of…

Is Snoring Bad?

Noisy night breathing may mean serious health issues Oh, snoring. Unfortunately, not many people consider this habit a good thing! The noisy breathing sounds, such as wheezes, whistles, or rattles, not only disrupt your bed partner, but also signal that your airway is blocked. While there are routine reasons, such as a cold or allergies that an airway may be temporarily clogged, chronic snoring may be a symptom of a potentially serious condition that’s associated with an increased risk for heart disease: obstructive sleep apnea. And in children, snoring can indicate large tonsils or other physical abnormalities that contribute to obstructed breathing. What’s more, snoring, itself, may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease….