Register | Login
About Bedroom Lifestyle Age Science Login Register

Sleep Timing & Duration

How to Train Yourself to Go to Sleep Earlier

Whether it’s because your schedule has changed and you need to start waking up earlier or you just want to sneak in more snooze time, sometimes it makes sense to move your bedtime earlier. The question is: How can you do that without setting yourself up to lie in bed counting sheep? It takes a little advanced planning, but it can be done. Here’s how. Give yourself a curfew. First, set a specific bedtime for yourself. Turn off all digital devices 30 minutes to an hour before you plan to turn in for the night. The reason: Exposure to light-emitting screens can reset your body’s circadian rhythm, making it harder to fall asleep when you…

Making a Resolution to Sleep Better? 5 Simple Tips

While the most popular New Year’s resolutions tend to be about exercising more often or eating more healthfully, many people also vow to become better sleepers. If you want to make 2017 the year that you finally prioritize your zzz’s, try these five easy tips.  Cut out your afternoon coffee and your nightcap. Caffeine and alcohol can make it tough to get quality sleep. Consider having caffeine only in the morning and early afternoon—you definitely don’t want any in the six hours leading up to bedtime. And while alcohol may help you nod off initially, it does cause you to wake up throughout the night. A good rule of thumb: Don’t drink booze…

How to survive on fragmented sleep

Sleep deprivation is nothing to yawn at. Not only does it leave you tired (and grumpy) the next day, but it can also impede your brain’s ability to form memories, increase your risk of depression, and even trigger overeating. But when you’re a new parent, disrupted sleep can be a fact of life. Try these 6 tips for helping both yourself and your bundle of joy to get the shuteye that you need.Share nighttime shifts. A full night of interrupted sleep may leave you in a worse mood the next day than sleeping continuously—but still not getting enough. That’s because when you’re woken up repeatedly, your body can’t get through the sleep stages to…

What Does Losing an Hour's Sleep Mean to You?

Many people experience a mix of emotions with the start of Daylight Saving Time, including an appreciation for the longer days, annoyance at the need to change every clock, and hope that spring will soon arrive. Accompanying these emotions are the physical and mental challenges of adapting to the time change. These challenges are due, in large part, to the loss of an hour’s sleep. What does losing an hour’s sleep mean to you? Think of all the benefits we gain from sufficient, high quality sleep. Better cognitive performance, increased emotional regulation, heightened ability to make healthy choices, and more efficient physical activity, are just some of…

What is Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder?

Everyone has trouble falling asleep once in a while. But for some extreme night owls, going to bed at a normal time—and waking up when they need to for school or work—is a challenge every night. Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), also called delayed sleep phase syndrome or delayed sleep phase type, is just that: not being able to fall asleep within at least two hours of when you want to. People with DSPD generally don’t have trouble getting good quality sleep once they do drift off. But staying up late often means not having time to log enough sleep before morning. Not surprisingly, daytime sleepiness can be a common problem, but that’s…

Is It Possible to Get Too Much Sleep?

Experts often talk about how Americans aren’t getting nearly enough sleep these days. But what about the opposite problem? Sure, it’s a lot less common, but is it bad to get way more than the recommended amount of sleep? The answer is yes. First, a quick note: This is not referring to people who sleep slightly more than seven to nine hours a night. For instance, routinely getting 10 hours of sleep is still healthy, even though most people don’t need it (only about two percent of the population does). It’s also not about people who sleep in super late one Saturday after a long week, are dealing with jet lag, are

Summertime Sleep Schedules for Kids

Three ways to ensure summer vacation doesn’t negatively impact your child’s sleep In my clinical practice parents often complain about how difficult it can be to maintain a consistent sleep schedule in the summer. With long days, children will often wake early with the sun, and few children want to go to bed when it is still light out (especially when they could be playing outside!). It is very easy to get off schedule during the summer without the routine of school and with the added distractions of long days and vacations. If a child does not need to wake for summer camp or other activities, then a later bedtime and wake time is…

The Latest Sleep Trackers That Attach To Your Wrist

You may initially buy these new activity trackers to learn about how many calories you burn in a day, but keep them on at night and you’ll learn lots of information about how you’re sleeping. Wearable activity trackers aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. And for people who want to learn more about their sleep habits, this is a good thing. That’s because many of the newest activity trackers, like the four below, double as sleep monitors—just wear them on your wrist through the night to get details about the quality and duration of your sleep. Fitbit Charge HR: The latest offering from Fitbit features a heart rate monitor that tracks your pulse through…

Why Do We "Spring Forward" But "Fall Back" With Daylight Saving Time?

Myths, truths, and debates about switching the clocks The terms “spring forward” and “fall back” are used to describe a practice of changing standard time with the intention of  “saving” (as in, making better use of) natural light. During daylight savings time (DST), clocks are turned ahead one hour, so that the sun rises later in the morning and sets later in the evening. The change is reversed in autumn. Originally enacted in the United States as a wartime conservation effort, observance of DST became federal law in 1918. (To dispel a common myth: It was not enacted for farmers—in fact, most farmers fought for its repeal.) While it was quickly repealed after the war ended,…

How to Handle the Time Change

A few simple steps can get you back on track quickly. It happens every year, but Daylight Saving Time still manages to catch many people by surprise. Every spring, clocks are pushed forward one hour from 2:00am to 3:00am to start Daylight Saving Time. And every fall, they are dropped back an hour (2:00am becomes 1:00am) to go into Standard Time. Almost everyone in the U.S. springs forward on the second Sunday in March and falls back on the first Sunday in November. That means that the second Monday in March is likely going to be a day when most people will feel exhausted, thanks to a way-too-early-seeming wake-up call. In fact, the average person…