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Sleep Disorders

Surgery for Snoring

For people with severe snoring problems, it can sometimes feel like there isn’t any way to fix the issue. So when nothing else works, it’s obvious why someone might consider surgery. Which kind of surgery is best? That depends on what is making you snore in the first place. Take a look at some common procedures below. One type of surgery for snoring focuses on the soft palate on the back of the roof of your mouth. When you snore, that area vibrates, causing the noise. So the idea is that if you make the palate stiffer, there will be fewer vibrations (and therefore less noise). You can opt for radiofrequency palatoplasty,…

Depression and Sleep

A Troubling Link Twenty million Americans are affected by depression, an illness that produces overwhelming and persistent feelings of sadness, anxiety, and hopelessness. In addition to bringing about changes in appetite and energy, depression is also associated with poor sleep. The most common problem is an inability to fall and/or stay asleep (also known as insomnia); oversleeping affects only a small percentage of those with depression. The link between sleep and depression is not completely understood. The disorder may lead to sleep problems, but it’s also possible that a lack of adequate rest intensifies depression. In fact, those with insomnia are ten times more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with…

What Is REM Behavior Disorder?

If you suffer from this rare sleep disorder, having a scary dream can lead to a dangerous situation. You may take for granted the fact that, no matter how scary a dream may get, in the real world you are actually just sleeping safely in your bed. But that isn’t the case if you have a sleep disorder known as REM behavior disorder (RBD). People who suffer from RBD physically move their bodies while dreaming—and sometimes they even get out of bed and react to what is happening in their dreams. Dreaming happens during only the REM stage of sleep, a phase of sleep that happens a few times a night. During…

What Are Some Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders?

Discover whether one of these five sleep disorders is keeping you from your best night’s rest. If you have a hard time falling asleep and waking up when you need to, you might have what’s known as a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Typically, your body clock regulates a regular daily rhythm of temperature and hormone levels that—combined with other factors like light exposure, meals, and exercise—tells you when it’s time to sleep at night and be awake during the day. Sometimes, however, the rhythms get off course, resulting in poor sleep and daytime drowsiness. There are a variety of these disorders—and if one sounds like it might be what you have, talk to your…

Should I Visit a Sleep Clinic?

Find out whether or not a sleep clinic may help you fix your slumber problems. You’ve tried warm milk, soothing music, an earlier bedtime, a new mattress, melatonin…the list goes on and on, but you’re still staring at the ceiling every night unable to sleep. Before you resign yourself to a life of counting sheep, know that a sleep clinic could help you get the rest you need. What Is a Sleep Clinic? Many sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia can be difficult to pinpoint while you’re awake, so doctors use sleep clinics to monitor patients overnight. While most sleep studies are set up to resemble private hotel rooms (to…

What is Sleep Apnea?

Learn the signs that may point to this condition.   Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night gasping for air? Does your partner complain about your incessant, loud snoring? Do you feel more tired in the morning than when you went to bed? Then you could be one of the 18 million American adults who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is a condition in which the upper passages of your airways close up, cutting off your oxygen and interrupting your breathing until you wake up and start breathing again. The only way to confirm whether you have sleep apnea is to take a sleep test, where experts record what happens while…

What Is A Cpap Machine?

Everything you need to know about this sleep apnea treatment.   After being diagnosed with sleep apnea, there’s a chance that your doctor may give you a CPAP machine as a form of treatment. It’s a little more unusual than, say, popping a pill, so understanding how it works may answer any questions that you might have and/or ease any concerns. Q: What is a CPAP Machine? A: CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. The machines help people with sleep apnea breathe more easily and regularly every night while they are sleeping. A CPAP machine increases the air pressure in your throat to prevent your airway from collapsing when you inhale. It also decreases snoring (which…

Sleep Talking: What is it?

  Say what? Find out why some people talk in their sleep. Are you quite the gabber during the night, or is your sleeping partner? Learn more, below, about why people chatter during slumber. Sleep talking is a sleep disorder defined as talking during sleep without being aware of it. Technically called “somniloquy,” talking while you get your zzz’s can occur during any stage of sleep, but it is most likely to be comprehensible to a bed partner during REM sleep. Talking during deeper sleep (NREM sleep, stages three and four) just sounds like gibberish. Talking during any sleep stage can involve mumbles, moans, calling out, or whispering, but it is not considered a product of consciousness….

Why People Snore

The reasons behind one of the noisiest (and most frustrating) nighttime issues   Chances are, you know what snoring sounds like and how annoying it can be to listen to. But why does it happen? That is less well-known. The basic reason for the rumbling is tissue in and around the upper airways that, during the act of breathing, vibrates. Those vibrations are what produce the sound. It isn’t always the same body part vibrating—it can be the tongue, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, or other areas. And although it seems obvious, it’s worth noting that nobody snores when they are awake. This is because when you sleep, the muscles relax in your body, including…