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Napping

Sleeping During the Day: Is it OK?

The good news about napping—and the downsides of nodding off mid-day.   Sneaking in some sleep midday is linked to a long list of benefits, including improved mood, better memory, reduced fatigue, and even lowered blood pressure. In addition, while your body clock is set to help you feel alert in the morning and sleepy in the evening, it’s also programmed to make you feel naturally tired mid-afternoon, and a nap has been shown as the best way to cope with this fatigue. That said, naps aren’t for everyone. Some people wake up from an afternoon snooze feeling groggier than they did before they fell asleep, and for others, napping can interfere with the quality…

When Should Kids Stop Napping?

Learn when it’s time for your child to say goodbye to naps. Ah, naptime. It can be the cure for toddler crankiness, a sacred time for e-mail checking, and generally a sanity-saver for parents and caregivers alike. Plus, kids who nap have longer attention spans, are less fussy, and sleep better at night. But, of course, you know that your child won’t nap forever. The big question looms: When does it all end? Sleep Training Tips for ChildrenVideo production in partnership with Over…

Toddlers and Napping: How Much is Normal?

The art and science of keeping your kid well-rested throughout the day It is a truth that most parents learn early on: Toddlers need a lot of sleep to stay happy (and get the energy that they need to keep growing). And that sleep doesn’t all happen at night. No matter how much slumber they get when it’s dark out, they still need some serious stretches of shut-eye during the day. And this need for naptimes is actually a good thing for the whole family: You need those moments of daytime downtime to regroup and focus on yourself, too! Sleep Training Tips for Children

History of the Siesta

How the beloved nap got its start The tradition of napping dates back thousands of years, with modern-day siestas originating in Spain. The name comes from the Latin hora sexta, which means “the sixth hour.” Since the hours of the day begin at dawn, the sixth hour is noon, which is when siestas often start. Due to Spain’s wide influence, siestas are common in Spanish-speaking nations around the world, as well as Greece, Italy, The Philippines, and Nigeria, to name a few. Siestas typically occur in hot climates, allowing people to sleep though the hottest part of the day and avoid the sun’s strong midday rays. While the siesta is now considered a luxury, it was…

How to Nap at Work

Real-world tricks to squeeze in some shut-eye on the job and boost your productivity Daytime drowsiness can affect concentration, accuracy, mood, productivity, and creativity. Sleep-deprived workers are also at greater risk for health issues, such as hypertension, diabetes, and depression. When it comes to boosting your productivity, sleeping on the job may not be such a bad thing after all: A brief nap may provide greater alertness for several hours. Try these tips to sneak in naptime at work. Take It Early. For most of us, our inner body clocks start to make us feel drowsy around siesta time—usually somewhere between 2:00pm and 3:00pm. Aim to fit in a cat nap during these hours, so it…

How Long Is an Ideal Nap?

Learn how many minutes to doze to feel happier and more alert. To nap or not to nap: That is the question! You may think that taking a catnap will make you feel more tired than skipping it altogether, but that’s not necessarily true. The key to waking up refreshed from a nap is all about timing. Just 20 minutes is all you need to get the benefits of napping, such as improved alertness, enhanced performance, and a better mood. Naps of that length keep you in the lightest stage of non-REM sleep, making it easier for you to get up and go after your snooze session. Be sure to set an alarm so you…

Napping Around the World

Find out how daytime snoozing habits vary in other cultures. In some parts of the world, life practically comes to a grinding halt in the early afternoon. People head home from work for a siesta, as it’s known in Spain, or a riposo, as it’s called in Italy. Whether that means a short nap of 20 minutes (the traditional meaning of the word siesta) or a major mid-afternoon break varies from one country to another. But in many parts of the world—including Greece, the Philippines, Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Nigeria—naps are seamlessly woven into the tapestry of everyday life. The tradition began as a necessity in some parts of the world, where, in the afternoon, the heat…