Register | Login
About Bedroom Lifestyle Age Science Login Register

Circadian Rhythm / Body Clock

What Are Some Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders?

Discover whether one of these five sleep disorders is keeping you from your best night’s rest. If you have a hard time falling asleep and waking up when you need to, you might have what’s known as a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Typically, your body clock regulates a regular daily rhythm of temperature and hormone levels that—combined with other factors like light exposure, meals, and exercise—tells you when it’s time to sleep at night and be awake during the day. Sometimes, however, the rhythms get off course, resulting in poor sleep and daytime drowsiness. There are a variety of these disorders—and if one sounds like it might be what you have, talk to your…

Alternatives to Traditional Alarm Clocks

These five styles make waking up a little more fun. When you think about alarm clocks, there may seem to be just two main options: the classic style that starts ringing and stops only when the snooze button gets hit, and the more modern smart phone variety. But there are actually a lot of different kinds of alarm clocks. Find the one that’s best for you and it will make getting up on the right side of the bed a lot easier.  Philips Vibrating Alarm Clock ($19.99; Philips.com): Attach this device to your pillow and wake up to vibrations instead of a startling, loud buzzing. Since the movement is silent, nobody else in the…

What's Your Morning Routine?

Check out this advice from industry pros on how to kick-start your day to ensure better sleep. It’s 7:00am—what are you doing? Hopefully, you’re practicing one of the following morning routines that health experts, CEOs, and more use. Not only do these routines boost your overall wellbeing, but they can actually improve your sleep at the end of the day. Read on for tips on how you can make their habits work for you. Have a Regular Wake-Up Time. Scott Weiss, a New York City physical therapist and trainer who has worked with the National Football League and gymnast Kerry Strugg, sets his alarm for the same time every morning—whether or not he actually has to…

Interrupted Sleep: What Happens To Your Body

Waking up throughout the night does a lot more than make you exhausted. There are lots of reasons why you might spend a restless night waking up every few hours, checking the clock, and feeling disappointed that it’s still nowhere near morning. Maybe there’s a new baby who has to be fed regularly, a sick dog who needs frequent trips to the backyard, neighbors who have rocking parties, or just a racing brain that makes staying asleep tough. Whatever the cause, you’re bound to wake up tired the next morning. But that’s not all. There are a few other ways that waking up often throughout the night affects your physical and mental health.Your Brain Isn’t…

How to Help Your Partner Get More Sleep

  You’ll both have a better night once you make these changes in the bedroom. Those grumpy grunts and groans that you hear from your significant other when the alarm goes off each morning are clear signs that he or she isn’t getting enough sleep. That’s bad news for you (since no one wants to wake up to a cranky husband or wife!) and bad news for your other half. Not only is sleep deprivation linked to obesity, heart disease, and other health issues, but it may also reduce productivity at work. In addition, lack of sleep negatively affects the area of the brain that’s responsible for creativity. While there are plenty of steps that your spouse…

Understanding Sleep Cycles: What Happens While You Sleep

Learn what is really going on in your body while you’re getting your zzz’s. Before the 1950’s, scientists used to believe that as people drifted off to sleep, their brains and bodies would go into “shutdown” mode, entering a passive state that allowed them to recover from the previous day. What researchers have since learned: Sleep is a whole lot more complicated, and it’s a much more active state than you might think. In fact, while you’re getting your zzz’s, your brain goes through various patterns of activity. It’s a predictable cycle that includes two distinct parts – NREM, or Non-REM sleep, plus a REM or “Rapid Eye Movement” cycle. Check out what happens in…

How to Keep Your Body Clock on Track

Embrace your body’s rhythm with these all-natural time-keeping tips. It may not always feel like it when you’re in denial of a beeping alarm clock, but your brain is actually very good at knowing when it’s time to sleep, wake, and even eat. Your circadian (which literally means “about a day”) rhythm responds to environmental cues—like sunlight—that tell your body to feel drowsy or alert, depending on the time of day. Sounds easy, right? It can be. But shift work, travel, and even electronic devices can throw things out of whack. Check out some simple ways to tune up your inner clock for better sleep and more alert days. 1. Keep it Regular The best way to keep…

Circadian Rhythm and Your Body Clock

Understanding your body’s internal clock—or circadian rhythm—is the first step to better sleep. Your circadian rhythm (also known as your sleep/wake cycle or body clock) is a natural, internal system that’s designed to regulate feelings of sleepiness and wakefulness over a 24-hour period. This complex timekeeper is controlled by an area of the brain that responds to light, which is why humans are most alert while the sun is shining and are ready to sleep when it’s dark outside. Your circadian rhythm causes your level of wakefulness to rise and dip throughout the day. Most people feel the strongest desire to sleep between 1:00pm and 3:00pm (a.k.a. the post-lunch, afternoon crash) and then again between 2:00am…