Register | Login
About Bedroom Lifestyle Age Science Login Register

Allergies

How Often Do I Really Need to Wash My Bedding?

Every week, you likely spend anywhere from 49 to 63 hours on your sheets. That leaves a lot of time for sweat, oil, dirt, and maybe even makeup to build up, possibly leading to skin issues like breakouts, more allergy symptoms, and even conditions like fungal infections. That’s why it’s so important to keep your sheets clean. But just how often should you wash them? Running your sheets through the washer too often can break down the fabrics and cause them to wear out faster. On the other hand, washing them too rarely can let all that dirt and all those allergens like dust mites build up. There isn’t a hard-and-fast rule for how…

Allergy-Proof Your Bedroom

If you’re sneezing, sniffling, or struggling with nasal stuffiness or other telltale signs of allergies, it’s time to take steps to rid your bedroom of allergens and other irritants. After all, your bedroom is where you probably spend the most time in your home—ideally, seven to nine hours per night—so it’s wise to make it an allergy-free zone. That way, you can breathe easier and avoid letting allergies affect your sleep. Here are five things to do.Keep the humidity in the right zone.The ideal range is 30 to 50 percent; check yours with a hygrometer (which is available at drugstores). If the humidity in your bedroom is too high…

Spring-Clean Your Bedroom

Want to sleep better, longer, or more comfortably? Now that you’re in spring-cleaning mode, this is the perfect opportunity to assess the state of your bedroom. After all, there may be sneaky factors—such as unwanted light or scratchy bedding—that could be compromising the quality of your slumber. With some simple changes, you can turn your bedroom into a tranquil sleep sanctuary that will set you up for the restorative zzz’s that you want and deserve every night. Check your lighting. Hopefully, you’ve already banned electronics (including computers, tablets, phones, and TVs) from your bedroom, since the blue light from these devices can interfere with melatonin production. The next step is to strike the right balance…

Asthma and Sleep

When you think about it, it makes sense that having asthma—a common respiratory condition—can make it tough to get high-quality sleep. Since asthma constricts the airways, it can lead to nighttime coughing, wheezing, and breathlessness, all of which make it hard to fall asleep and/or cause you to wake up in the middle of the night. People who have a condition known as “nocturnal asthma” may even find that their symptoms get even worse at night. Certain changes happen to the body at night, which are part of the natural circadian rhythm. If you’re healthy, they’re no big deal, but if you have asthma, they can make a bad problem even worse. For example,…

Spring Clean Your Sleep Routine

Make over your bedroom to score sounder shuteye Ah, spring! It’s the season for flowers, maxi dresses, March Madness—and getting your hands dirty by scrubbing your home from top to bottom. This year, be sure to include your bedroom in your spring-cleaning plans. Start with the following four steps, and not only will your room look (and smell!) nicer, but you may sleep better, too. 1. Clear Your Nightstand of Tech. If you leave your smartphone next to your bed, it’s time to find another place for it to spend the night. Not only can a 1:00am text message wake you up, but the blue light that the phone emits may actually disrupt your circadian…

Refresh Your Sleep This Spring

  Springtime can do a number on your sleep. Find out what to do about it. The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and colorful buds are starting to pop from the ground. So why, when the rest of the world is so refreshed, aren’t you? For some people, spring can be a tough time of year to get a restful night’s sleep. But it doesn’t have to be. Below, check out some reasons that you might be tossing and turning during this time of year—and what you can do about it.   Sleep Stealer: Allergies How to Rest Easy: Allergies can crop up any time of year, but pollen tends to be at its peak in the spring….

Ways to Keep Your Bedroom Allergy-Free

Simple tricks to clear the air so you can sleep more soundly. Allergies can make you feel drowsy, but symptoms such as itchy eyes, sneezing, and a runny nose can make it tough to actually fall asleep. That’s why taking steps to clear the air in your bedroom is so important for getting more quality shut-eye. Since allergies occur when your immune system overreacts to typically harmless things, such as pollen, dust mites, or cat dander, the key to easing symptoms so you can doze off faster is to squelch those allergy triggers. Below, eight ways to do it.  Vacuum Away. Dust mites love finding a home in carpets, so be sure to vacuum at least…

Household Allergens That Could Be Affecting Your Sleep

Squelch the stuffy nose that’s keeping you up at night by sleuthing out the hidden triggers in your home. Sniffling, sneezing, and itchy eyes aren’t the only unfortunate side effects that come with allergies; disturbed sleep is a side effect, too. And it’s a serious one: Impaired slumber can lead to fatigue, decreased productivity, depression, and memory problems. Allergies can even increase your risk of obstructive sleep apnea. Clearly, it’s crucial to cope with allergies in the name of a good night’s rest. How Allergies Interfere With Sleep Allergens in the air cause what’s known as allergic rhinitis, or the inflammation and irritation of the nasal passages. They can also trigger the body to produce histamines,…

How Humidity Impacts Sleep

Weird ways the weather can keep people up at night—and how to keep it from disrupting your slumber. The role that weather plays in how well you sleep may surprise you—especially when it comes to humidity. Unless your bedroom is equipped with air conditioning, a hot, muggy day can lead to less restful slumber. High humidity makes it more difficult for moisture to evaporate off your body, which can make you hot and uncomfortable (not to mention sweaty!). Cotton bedding, which breathes better than silk or polyester sheets, may help keep you cool, as can wicking pajamas (since they pull sweat away from your body). But comfort isn’t the only issue: High humidity can…