Register | Login
About Bedroom Lifestyle Age Science Login Register
Prev Article:

#GoodNights Bedroom Tour and Q&A With Alison Vinciguerra of Long Distance Loving

Next Article:

The Sleeping Power of the Lovey

 

Meg shares how making #GoodNights a priority helped get her refresh her bedtime routine and ease insomnia conserns in this exclusive Q&A!

Each month, the National Sleep Foundation is partnering with select bloggers and digital influencers for a new iteration of the #GoodNights challenge. We’ll explore new ways to get a good night’s rest by showcasing real life examples of how a good night’s sleep can positively impact your body, mind and spirit. We know that many of our readers want real life tips for sleeping better, so follow along and share your own #GoodNights stories by using hashtag across social media channels like Twitter and Instagram.

 

April’s Sleep Challenge

It took a bit longer than usual this year, but it appears that spring has finally sprung throughout the country. As a result, we’re going full throttle into spring cleaning mode, throwing open the windows, wiping away those dust bunnies and re-evaluating the most important room in our home … the bedroom.

We asked Meg, the blogger behind MegBiram.com, to utilize the National Sleep Foundation’s healthy bedroom tips to help craft the perfect sleep environment, with a focus on refreshing their room for increased aesthetic pleasure, better productivity and of course, a good old fashioned dose of spring cleaning for better overall health. We particularly love Meg for her #GSD (get sh*t done) motto, and know that staying focused is particularly important for a busy entrepreneur. Sleep has a serious tie-in with productivity – if you get #GoodNights, you’ll feel more alert and able to focus, as well as more likely to make good choices throughout the day – from the foods you eat to making sure you squeeze in a workout.

To help Meg make sure that #GoodNights were on the way, we sent her a packet of goodies that helped with both spring cleaning and aesthetics and relaxation in the bedroom, including pillow and mattress protectors and in-room aromatherapy from our licensed product partner PureCare, as well as gorgeous houseplants from Exotic Angel.

For nearly a week, Meg lived by the National Sleep Foundation’s guidelines in her newly-updated bedrooms … and here’s what she had to say in our exclusive Q&A:

Describe your sleeping habits, both before and after taking the #GoodNights challenge. Would you say you are/were a “good sleeper”? Are you a better sleeper now?

Throughout my entire life I have gone through cycles of insomnia and sometimes have trouble sleeping. Then there are other times where I have no problems sleeping. It probably corresponds with times of stress and anxiety and if I’m working out. Since I don’t have kids, and I’m an entrepreneur (meaning I make my own schedule) I usually get eight hours of sleep every night — which I think it really important.

I’m a light sleeper, but lately I’ve been falling asleep really early, probably because I’ve been getting myself to bed earlier as well. One of my goals this year is to try to read a lot more, so I try to get in bed an hour early just to read.

How did the tips and products offered from the National Sleep Foundation and partners change your sleep routine? Describe any noticeable differences, such as sounder sleep, increased sleep duration, or a change in bedtime routine?

Just last night as I was reading a book in bed, I thought, what is that lovely smell? I had forgotten about the lavender sachets in my pillow and was loving the light scent. I don’t know if it helped me sleep better, but it sure did make the experience of reading in bed and falling asleep more enjoyable.

How did this sleep refresh fit into your overall spring cleaning routine?

As someone who strives for a more minimal environment, I’m in a constant state of cleaning. I have been trying to get into bed earlier and read for longer (and not be on my phone looking at Instagram and Snapchat) — and that definitely helps me get to sleep earlier.

Did you have any problems with the challenge? For example, did you find it tough to avoid electronics before bed, or did you have trouble cutting out caffeine in the afternoons?

I rarely drink caffeine in the afternoon because if I do, I have a harder time falling asleep. So I only do if I know it’s going to be a late night or I’m really fading in the afternoon and need to be awake.

It is hard to not get on my phone before bed, but during this challenge I was reading a good book (an actual book, not even one on my iPad) so it worked out.

A look inside blogger Meg Biram's bedroom for The National Sleep Foundation.

Meg winds down at night by reading a book, choosing to turn off electronics several hours before bed.

bedroom reading nook - megbiram

The Exotic Angel plant in Meg’s reading nook emits a pleasant scent, helpful for relaxation.

meg biram - reading nook - plant

Even though Meg admits to not having the greenest thumb around, low maintenance houseplants, like the one shown from Exotic Angel, are ideal because they purify the air and also require minimal water and upkeep.

nightstand - meg biram

Keep nightstands uncluttered and minimalist to ensure a relaxing night’s rest.

 

Meg Biram

Meg or Megan (she responds to both), grew up in Kansas City, Mo. surrounded by her extended family. Curious and artistic even as a child, her parents supported her creative passions and enrolled their daughter in as many art classes as they could. As a teen (and budding fashionista) she developed a minor obsession with magazines. Nothing has changed there.A graduate of the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri, Meg studied advertising and magazine journalism. After college, she worked as the design editor at The Observer Media Group, in Sarasota, Fla. Her next job – senior designer at Hallmark Cards – took her back to Kansas City. After spending five years at Hallmark, she moved to Washington, D.C., where she started working as a full-time blogger, consultant, artist, and entrepreneur.

More Authors